What is the best metal for diamond rings?

Selecting what metal to use as a setting for your diamond is just as important as choosing the best diamond.

The following are metals that are commonly offered by most retailers:

  • Platinum
  • Palladium
  • Gold

Pure 24 karat gold is too soft to be used in diamond jewelry.

Silver is not used to set diamonds because of its softness.

Which metal is the best for diamond rings? Most jewelers agree that is is Platinum.

Platinum is the king of metals. Ranking the highest in durability and purity its resistance to wear makes it the most secure and protective metal. Platinum is also rare, making it just as symbolic as the rare diamond you choose for your ring.

Platinum won’t change shape even over a long period of time so the precious stones continue to be held firmly and securely. All precious metals scratch, but due to platinum’s density, when it is scratched, it is merely displaced so it will not actually be losing mass. Gold on the other hand loses very tiny amounts metal when scratched.

Another excellent choice for a diamond ring’s setting is Palladium.

National Jeweler magazine has been educating both the public and jewelry sales teams on the benefits of palladium.

Palladium has been known since 1803 when it was first discovered by William Hyde Wollaston. Palladium was named after the asteroid Pallas, which had been in the news at the time having been first sighted in 1801. Palladium began being used in jewelry around 1939 when smart jewelers realised that it was extremely durable and thereby presented excellent value for high quality jewelry. As a rare and lustrous silvery-white metal, palladium is one of a number of metals in the platinum group of metals. These include platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium and osmium. Palladium being from this family of precious metals shares the strength of platinum.
Palladium has been found in Australia, Africa, Canada, South America and North America. The vast majority of palladium used in the United States is mined in North America. The Stillwater Mining Company, located in Montana, is the only source of palladium in the United States and has received awards for its green mining practices.

Palladium is strong and durable. Weighing less than platinum because of its low density allows for bigger and bolder jewelry designs to be created. Their extra size doesn’t hamper them being worn with ease. Plus, since it’s naturally white, there’s no expensive maintenance to keep it brilliant for life.

A growing number of fashion-forward jewelry designers have chosen palladium as their metal of choice. Typically less expensive than platinum or gold also makes palladium the preference for smart shoppers who want affordable luxury.

Those allergic to some other metals will love palladium’s purity. Palladium is pure because it gets its color and luster from nature. Other metals that are not naturally white are mixed with nickel to appear white – and nickel can cause allergic reactions.

If you are wondering which metal looks whiter,  pure palladium or pure platinum, consumers often say the two look identical.

Two online retailers that have beautiful diamonds and also offer palladium settings are: DiamondWave, and Diamonds-USA.

Another popular choice for diamond rings is Gold. Eighteen karat gold was considered until recent times to be too soft for diamond jewelry. Modern metallurgical techniques have made it possible to use 18 karat gold in jewelry without the risk of stones falling out. Retailers often market so-called white gold. Gold, as you know, is yellow. Anything labeled as white gold has either been mixed with other alloys and hence is usually 14k gold. This makes it stronger and as a result may look whiter. To make it even whiter gold may have been rhodium dipped, which means it has a surface coating of a whiter metal called rhodium. The rhodium plating is not permanent as rhodium is too soft to be impervious to scratches and abrasion. This means it will eventually need to be re-dipped, as the coating will wear off over time. Rhodium dipped “white gold” is usually very similar in price to palladium, so it would be my recommendation to buy palladium rather than “white gold”, if platinum is beyond the budgetary limits you have set for yourself.

Yellow gold is often the choice for anyone choosing a diamond with slightly more coloring. The contrast of the yellow gold ring when seen next to the very slight coloring of the diamond will make the diamond’s coloring less noticeable. Yellow gold is also nice with colorless diamonds. The yellow color of the gold does not make the diamond look yellow.

How to pick the best diamond on a $5000 budget

In this article I am going to show you how to choose the nicest possible diamond on a budget of $5000.

We’ll use DiamondWave for this example. DiamondWave own every single diamond they present on their website, so you are guaranteed you will actually get the diamond you choose. The majority of the diamonds they have are round brilliant, which are the most sought after type of diamonds for engagement rings. Their diamonds are all high quality, so there’s hardly any chance you can go wrong, so this is a good place to start for a first time buyer.

As we have set a budget of $5000 for this exercise ,  we’ll be using part of it for the loose diamond, and part of it for the ring setting.

The $5000 will have to cover:

1. The metal band

2. The gem (or gems)

If I first choose the metal for the ring then I’ll know how much I can budget for the diamond and any extra gems.

What’s best? Gold, Platinum, or Palladium?

I recommend  going with palladium.

Palladium offers all the benefits of the king of metals, platinum, but without the hefty price tag. As it is considerably easier on the wallet (comparable in price to 14K gold)  it leaves more for us to budget on the diamond. Very pure gold (24K to 18K) is generally not used in diamond jewelry. Pure gold is quite soft. Gold has to be mixed with other metals to make it durable enough to carry diamonds. And many people prefer the white look of platinum for diamond rings. There is also a type of metal that is marketed as “White gold”. This is yellow gold that has been dipped in rhodium to make its surface white. It’s like gold plating in reverse which is not the most sensible of options.

All that to say, palladium is a good choice. It’s a choice you won’t regret as it is an excellent metal for holding diamonds securely in place, and it is hypo-allergenic so anyone with sensitive skin won’t get a rash from it. Some people are allergic to some yellow gold alloys.

Read more about choosing metals at DiamondWave.

choosing a diamond ring setting
I’ll choose a solitaire ring setting. This displays the diamond nicely.

In this example I will be choosing a ring which is not the very cheapest, so I know it’s got some substance: A nice durable palladium ring. As you can see DiamondWave’s prices are also good in the ring department.

choose the ring size
Here I choose the ring size and whether there will be 4 prongs or 6 prongs to hold the diamond in place. I choose 4 prongs  since this is the right amount for holding the type of diamond I will be choosing whether Round Brilliant, Princess, Emerald Cut, or Asscher.

 

I then click Add This Setting To Ring. I am then presented with the Diamond Search page.

Searching for a Princess cut diamond.

 

I have $4,450 budgeted for the diamond after setting $550 aside for the setting.

I then slide the sliders to narrow my search according to my preferences. The most important one is Cut. I won’t even consider anything that has a cut less than Excellent. Diamond grading certificates only give a cut grade for round brilliant diamonds.  DiamondWave has confirmed that all their diamonds are a very good grade, or better. This makes searching for a good diamond at DiamondWave easy, since fancy cuts (like Princess, Asscher, Oval, and such) do not get their cut grade mentioned on the GIA certificate.

In order for the search parameters to show which Princess (or other fancy cut) diamonds are available I have to expand the parameters a little to include Very Good Cut.

Since DiamondWave have a 45 day return policy, there is plenty of time to inspect the merchandise and get a different stone if needed. But sticking to higher quality ones will minimize any chance of that happening.

Choosing the preferences for a princess cut diamond
Cut grade is very important. But color should not be neglected. Princess diamonds should be “I” color or lighter. If you can’t look at the diamond it’s a much safer bet to choose one with a clarity rating of VVS2 or higher.

The first two on this list make excellent candidates for an engagement ring. The first one is 4.8 mm across, and the second one 5.1mm across. I looked at their grading reports to get this information.

If you decide you want more choice you can always look at the round diamonds.

As DiamondWave have many more round brilliant diamonds in stock I performed a slightly different search. I decided to narrow it down by adjusting the carat weight slider; as well as the polish and symmetry sliders.

choosing preferences for a round brilliant diamond
Symmetry is quite important, so I’ve slid the slider way up to show only Excellent Symmetry. In order to show only sized that would look good in an engagement ring I have slid the Carat Weight to 0.65.

The search with the options you see in the image above gave me the choice of 11 round diamonds. There were also the two princess cut diamonds from the previous search to consider. All of them fall within the budget I set at the beginning of this exercise, and any one of those will be beautiful.

If you look at the prices displayed, you will see that all of them fall within the allocated amount, and if desired the largest one can be selected which is a 0.77 carat diamond, I color, for $3,604. Alternately the diamond with the highest color grade can be selected: 0.74 carat, G color, for $4,226. The size of the two will be indistinguishable. Even though the color difference will only be slight, G color diamonds are real nice, and might be the one you find more alluring.

Another nice thing about dealing with DiamondWave is that you can call them up and ask them to have a look at the diamond you are interested in. They’ll be able to give you a first hand account of what it looks like, which can be extremely helpful. I highly recommend this.

Start your own search now: http://www.diamondwave.com/-strse-Build-Your-Own-Ring-cln-Diamond-Solitaire-Rings

Enhanced by Zemanta